Why Paul Mampilly Mysteriously Left Wall Street And What His Current Schedule Looks Like

Paul Mampilly has been all over the place coming from a blue collar family in India and cleaning cafeterias and pumping gas to get through college, and ultimately leading a wealthy life on Wall Street but then leaving that life as well. It was a shocking day when Wall Street realized Mampilly had left in the prime of his career at age 42 as he had been a fantastic investment advisor to some of the top fortune 500 companies and investment banks. He was also seen frequently on CNBC and the Fox Business Network where he talked about good investment trends and about where the market could be headed, but he explained after leaving that he no longer wanted this life.

Paul Mampilly’s primary reason for leaving Wall Street was that working there took away too much time with his family. He reported working sometimes as much as 16 hours in a day which brought in an enormous paycheck and a fantastic New York home, but it made spending time with his wife and growing children difficult and he didn’t want to miss their childhood. And the second was that his investment advice was only benefiting the millionaires and billionaires while leaving out the everyday working middle class people who he really wanted to help. He’s helping them now as an author at Banyan Hill, a financial advisory company that offers independent investing research at a much less price than most investment insider information would cost at big Wall Street publishers.

Mampilly’s education consists of a bachelor’s degree in finance at Montclair State University, and later an master’s in accounting at Fordham University. His entry into investment advisory services began as a researcher for Deutsche Bank, and he served in high profile account management services at ING and Banker’s Trust. He joined Kinetics International Fund in 2006 where he brought in 26% annual returns for the notable clients and even grew its AUM to $25 billion. His biggest accolade was making stock investments as part of the Templeton Foundation‘s competition that brought in a 76% gain and doing so during the 2008 recession without shorting or taking on high-risk funds. Interviews with Paul Mampilly

What Paul Mampilly is doing now is showing investors how they can start building their own portfolio and do so by finding little-known company stocks. Mampilly did the same thing when he invested in Facebook, Netflix and Sarepta Therapeutics several years ago and saw those stocks boom in the coming years. Mampilly not only makes investing easy to understand for beginners, he even allows his followers to take a look at his portfolio. Extreme Fortunes by Paul Mampilly, 10,000% Marijuana Stock

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